Project Three – Wolf Mountain Chronicle

Welcome to Wolf Mountain Chronicles! Project Three for the Fiction Writers Community. This page is the hub our second project. Below you will find all the information you need to interact with your fellow community and navigate through the project. Enjoy!

Wolf Mountain Chronicle - Book Project Three

The forums are the place to discuss and work on the individual book chapters. Start exploring the forums using the tabs below.

Dive into Chapter One:

man running in heavy rainy night,illustration

Everything is gone, and I do mean everything. And now this. Is this how it all ends, I can’t help but wonder while sitting behind the wheel of my vintage 1968 Ford Ranger pickup? I’d finally reached the deepest pit of despair in a location that looked every bit like the end of the world as we know it today.

The Ranger had been faithfully restored by my best friend Harvey Goad. The pearl and aqua green exterior and the matching interior glistened in the sun while sitting on the side of a desolate stretch of roadway. The combination of stunning colors, original stock fixtures down to the ingeniously crafted white wall tires proved to be a devout commitment to quality and craftsmanship.

In some weird way, it was the truck that prevented me from ending it all right here. I think it’s fair to say I’d had enough. I’d gone as far as I could go both mentally and physically. But the sheer beauty of the truck seemed to somehow hold the last few threads of normalcy together in some weird, pleasurable way.

It all seemed to come down to the glistening, polished sheet metal and the regular beat of the human heart. Man and machine at its finest. The bond seemed complete. Almost but not quite.

Lanny flashed through my brain at just the right moment though and thoughts of ending it all were suddenly obliterated from my mind by the human form of a woman I’d once loved more than anything else in the world.

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Follow the story in Chapter Two:

Everything is gone, and I do mean everything. And now this. Is this how it all ends, I can’t help but wonder while sitting behind the wheel of my vintage 1968 Ford Ranger pickup? I’d finally reached the deepest pit of despair in a location that looked every bit like the end of the world as we know it today.
The Ranger had been faithfully restored by my best friend Harvey Goad. The pearl and aqua green exterior and the matching interior glistened in the sun while sitting on the side of a desolate stretch of roadway. The combination of stunning colors, original stock fixtures down to the ingeniously crafted white wall tires proved to be a devout commitment to quality and craftsmanship.
In some weird way, it was the truck that prevented me from ending it all right here. I think it’s fair to say I’d had enough. I’d gone as far as I could go both mentally and physically. But the sheer beauty of the truck seemed to somehow hold the last few threads of normalcy together in some weird, pleasurable way.
It all seemed to come down to the glistening, polished sheet metal and the regular beat of the human heart. Man and machine at its finest. The bond seemed complete. Almost but not quite.
Lanny flashed through my brain at just the right moment though and thoughts of ending it all were suddenly obliterated from my mind by the human form of a woman I’d once loved more than anything else in the world.
The sheer hopelessness that has engulfed every fiber of my being is beginning to take its toll. For the moment I have become mentally prepared to deal with life as it is at precisely 7:05 AM on a bright, and crisp spring morning in the year 2015 perched near the rim of a million years gone by.
Between the thoughts of beautiful, gentle hearted Lanny and the gorgeous pickup, a real 60’s heartthrob of a throwback, I’d found myself hanging on by a slender thread. Those few sweet, mind altering moments were suddenly submersed in a burning thought though. There was something I needed to do, something I’d been wanting to do for sometime now.
While considering my plight on this desolate, yet serene country road in the very bowels of heartland America, I could not pull myself away from doing what I know I probably should not do. All life long, I’d been conditioned to think, act and walk like a man of faith. I’d been conditioned to speak the faith, and not judge others according to their individual weakness and inability to be as righteous as I appeared to be.

Get started on Chapter 3:

“I think I better stay behind.”

With a distinctive concerned look, he said, “Sure you want to do that? Could get a bit dicey later. Depends on how quickly I can get someone to respond at the other end. I’ll certainly pass the word along. Make sure the message gets in the right hands. I’m guessing we’re about 20 to 30 minutes to the next stop. I should get a cell signal there. I’ll let ‘em know you need help ASAP.”

“That would be great.”

“Since it’s Wednesday, shouldn’t be a problem locating a reliable tow service. Do you prefer a tow truck or a mechanic?”

Gee, I had to think about that one. I was still working to flush the lyrics to ‘Horse With No Name’ from my brain. Lets see, what makes the most sense. In another moment a combination of both seemed most reasonable. “Preferable a good mechanic who just happens to arrive in a tow truck.”

“All righty then, let me see what I can find for you. I’ll keep checking the phone for a signal as I go along. Maybe we can get this expedited even quicker.”

I sure like this man’s way of thinking. Finally, finally, I can taste a drop of good fortune. “I sure do appreciate your help.”

“Hey, that’s what a good human being is supposed to do, right? Help people in need? Sometimes we tend to lose sight of the basic human theme in life.”

Wolf Mountain Chronicle Project Members

Project One Progress

The Outline
Chapter Development
Character Development

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